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On Complexity and Simplicity: Biocentrism and the Universe

If everything when it occupies an equal space is at rest, and if that which is in locomotion is always occupying such a space at any moment, the flying arrow is therefore motionless.

-Aristotle

Biocentrism is a philosophy and cosmology which proposes that life is responsible for the creation of the universe, rather than the universe creating life. At the core of this theory is the  role consciousness plays in the creation of the reality we experience on a day to day basis – mainly, consciousness creates reality.

What does the author of this theory and the quantum physics conjured backbone mean by reality?  Our immediate experiences, the time and space in which we and objects around us move and interact, the actions we take, are developed and created by our consciousness. It is in our minds that the universe takes shape.

I will forgo the extensive arguments and justifications only because I hope to keep this post from becoming too extensive. The field of quantum physics and the strange attributes of this theory are widely documented in both academic and pop-science literature (a list of recommendations will be available at the end of this blog).

What an idea to consider. Could in fact the universe be created in not a single random occurrence or desire of a creator but in the flash of every moment we experience?

Scientists look at light, thanks to Einstein, as the constant in the universe. Not the constant of speed but rather the constant of everything. Light is the substance from which everything is compared. For example, time is not constant by any means. Neither is space. Both are relative to our speed in comparison to light. The faster we travel, our relation to light in both time and space remains the same. If I were to travel at 99% of the speed of light for 10 years and return to earth, I will have aged 10 years while the rest of the planet will have aged 70 years. Not only that, but my size while traveling would shrink to a fraction of my original physical state. I would compress, in both time and space – but my experience would not alter in the least. My experience as an “observer” will remain the same.

This is not the work of mental gymnastics on our parts. It is not that we adapt to conditions. It is that our experience is always relative to light.

Even our experiences on a moment by moment basis are not what they seem. Motion is not what it seems. Motion, the theory goes, is an illusion created by our consciousnesses ability to piece together the moment by moment. And at a quantum level, the very fabric of our bodies and reality are simply appearing and vanishing continually. Like the astute child in the Matrix stated, there simply is no spoon.

My point is that the universe is incredibly complex and our ever changing and evolving ideas regarding the nature and fabric of the universe present a picture of complexity as well as simplicity. Complexity in that, if this theory is in fact “true” (little “t” true as a working theory with tremendous potential to explaining the big picture) it has taken the greatest minds of our species to unravel the concepts we are now understanding. And simplicity in that the idea that there is a consciousness creating the order of our experiences.

Lately I have been thinking quite a bit about my withdrawal from organized religion. My reasons are many; some are quite earned, some preferential.  At the core is an intuitive notion that the way we view the universe is a reflection of the experiences of humanity up to this moment and is simply the beginning of an understanding that could take the lifetime of our species to unravel.

The concept of intuition is a dangerous ideal in our logic-centric culture. We view rational idealism as the end all summation of thought. And religions are as guilty of this as the law.

We are able to create almost any idea out of a text. It is up to the reader to interpret the concept and make sense of what is read. What I see in religion is a reliance on what is “read” (which is never simply read but rather always interpreted) and how this fits into the worldview of the reader, forming a rigid belief that is incapable of viewing external stimulus as of benefit.

What I would like to see in an organized religious system is an openness to the possibilities of the universe and the betterment of all people and things, a flexibility and ceremonial casting off of the rigidity of inflexible ideals, a development of intuitive notions as forming a more central role in belief, and a responsibility to listen to the ideas we all have – knowing that we come to different conclusions and this is something that makes our species great.

If our minds piece together the universe as it unfolds in front of us, the universe we interpret should be expected to have a different contextual association for each of us. But at the core are there beliefs or ideas that are central to all of our experiences that we can “tap into” and connect with in ways that extend our understanding for the benefit of us all?

How would a religious system such as this look and feel? As a born and raised Evangelical Christian, how would or could I combine my past with my present?

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