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Solutions: The Worst Word in the Business Lexicon -
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Solutions: The Worst Word in the Business Lexicon

“Most English-speaking people, for instance, will admit that cellar door is ‘beautiful’, especially if dissociated from its sense.” – J.R. Tolkein

Of all the words in the business lexicon, one stands above the rest in terms of saying as little as possible while still filling a space: solution/s. No other word is able to equally demonstrate a marketer’s lack of customer, product,  or market knowledge. Certainly, you must be thinking, there is a use for such a word. Certainly, if used appropriately, it conveys some meaning that is relevant to the occasion. Or perhaps certainly it has no meaning except to convey that a meaning is potential. But what if a company does in fact offer a solution?

Consider the following scenarios:

  • Little Billy is in the first grade. His teacher asks him to supply the answer to the equation 2+2. His answer? Solution.
  • Thomas is applying to college. On his application letter he informs the acceptance committee that as a part of his education he intends to provide solutions to questions and scenarios proposed by professors.
  • On a first date, Sarah tells her potential mate that the solutions she provides far exceed that of the competition.
  • A gas station on the side of a highway tells potential patrons to stop if requiring consumable hunger-satisfaction, refined petroleum for vehicular mobility, and nicotine delivery mechanism solutions.

If it does not seem acceptable to use this language in the previous examples, why so in marketing language? Why do marketers use solution in the first place?

Three reasons, I hypothesize: broad product categories, trends, and lack of understanding.

In the case of disparate product offerings,  many large businesses will offer a collection of products organized into an application. These applications are often called “turn-key solutions”. Products are also organized into application categories to simplify the selection process. A company may also provide a series of different products in multiple industries or categories. Rather than say products or applications, they offer solutions as a way of telling the customer that their products aren’t just for sell, but rather satisfy needs. True? Sure. Meaningful? I would say no.

Marketing language is a two way communication in which one side is implied. To say solution is to say “yes” in the invisible conversation. It is to communication that you do something without saying what you do.

A potentially nasty habit often displayed by smaller businesses is to idealize larger businesses and pick up their behaviors and trends. Much like the high school freshman idealizing the popular kid, small businesses look to industry titans for their standards, language, marketing ideas, and general inspiration. Fortune 500 companies often hire brilliant, talented people. However, trends often have a specific purpose. Companies should always consider the intention of trends before consuming. Because a larger business uses a phrase does not add validity to the usage. It does not make you look larger or more professional any more than saying “rad” makes you seem like a surfer.

At every trade show I attend I like to stand in the middle of the floor and read all the signs I can see from one location. There are beautiful designs and creative layouts. There are streams of logos and flashing signs. And then there is the display copy. Too often a logo could be moved from one booth to another while the copy remains the same. The copy is not product of business specific and generally very heavily laden with business jargon. And I have to simply shake my head and wonder what the designer was thinking.

Too often marketing teams are interested in what sounds good or what sounds “business-y” than what communicates directly with the customer. Solutions is often used in this scenario. It is easier to tell customers that you offer solutions than it is to understand and communicate what those solutions happen to be. But this is a waste of both your time and that of your customer. They leave the sign knowing exactly the same as what they knew before.

In summary:

  • Never say solution when the solution can be defined. Your customers expect that you will solve their problems.
  • Only communicate phrases that contain meaning or you will waste everyone’s time.
  • Only follow the leader if it makes sense. Assuming a more successful entity has it all figured out helps no one.
  • I suppose you can in fact use the word solutions, in selling to marketers.

Solutions: The Worst Word in the Business Lexicon

“Most English-speaking people, for instance, will admit that cellar door is ‘beautiful’, especially if dissociated from its sense.” – J.R. Tolkein

Of all the words in the business lexicon, one stands above the rest in terms of saying as little as possible while still filling a space: solution/s. No other word is able to equally demonstrate a marketer’s lack of customer, product,  or market knowledge. Certainly, you must be thinking, there is a use for such a word. Certainly, if used appropriately, it conveys some meaning that is relevant to the occasion. Or perhaps certainly it has no meaning except to convey that a meaning is potential. But what if a company does in fact offer a solution?

Consider the following scenarios:

  • Little Billy is in the first grade. His teacher asks him to supply the answer to the equation 2+2. His answer? Solution.
  • Thomas is applying to college. On his application letter he informs the acceptance committee that as a part of his education he intends to provide solutions to questions and scenarios proposed by professors.
  • On a first date, Sarah tells her potential mate that the solutions she provides far exceed that of the competition.
  • A gas station on the side of a highway tells potential patrons to stop if requiring consumable hunger-satisfaction, refined petroleum for vehicular mobility, and nicotine delivery mechanism solutions.

If it does not seem acceptable to use this language in the previous examples, why so in marketing language? Why do marketers use solution in the first place?

Three reasons, I hypothesize: broad product categories, trends, and lack of understanding.

In the case of disparate product offerings,  many large businesses will offer a collection of products organized into an application. These applications are often called “turn-key solutions”. Products are also organized into application categories to simplify the selection process. A company may also provide a series of different products in multiple industries or categories. Rather than say products or applications, they offer solutions as a way of telling the customer that their products aren’t just for sell, but rather satisfy needs. True? Sure. Meaningful? I would say no.

Marketing language is a two way communication in which one side is implied. To say solution is to say “yes” in the invisible conversation. It is to communication that you do something without saying what you do.

A potentially nasty habit often displayed by smaller businesses is to idealize larger businesses and pick up their behaviors and trends. Much like the high school freshman idealizing the popular kid, small businesses look to industry titans for their standards, language, marketing ideas, and general inspiration. Fortune 500 companies often hire brilliant, talented people. However, trends often have a specific purpose. Companies should always consider the intention of trends before consuming. Because a larger business uses a phrase does not add validity to the usage. It does not make you look larger or more professional any more than saying “rad” makes you seem like a surfer.

At every trade show I attend I like to stand in the middle of the floor and read all the signs I can see from one location. There are beautiful designs and creative layouts. There are streams of logos and flashing signs. And then there is the display copy. Too often a logo could be moved from one booth to another while the copy remains the same. The copy is not product of business specific and generally very heavily laden with business jargon. And I have to simply shake my head and wonder what the designer was thinking.

Too often marketing teams are interested in what sounds good or what sounds “business-y” than what communicates directly with the customer. Solutions is often used in this scenario. It is easier to tell customers that you offer solutions than it is to understand and communicate what those solutions happen to be. But this is a waste of both your time and that of your customer. They leave the sign knowing exactly the same as what they knew before.

In summary:

  • Never say solution when the solution can be defined. Your customers expect that you will solve their problems.
  • Only communicate phrases that contain meaning or you will waste everyone’s time.
  • Only follow the leader if it makes sense. Assuming a more successful entity has it all figured out helps no one.
  • I suppose you can in fact use the word solutions, in selling to marketers.

ramurphy

ramurphy

I’m a married, 30 something living in San Francisco. I spend my time eating well, getting together with friends, exploring new ideas and places, and reading wide into a variety of subjects. I love to learn and consider new ideas.

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