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42 and the Answer to the Meaning of Life -
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42 and the Answer to the Meaning of Life

The other day I told my therapist that if I was born 1,000 years ago I would have been a mystic. I was partly kidding but party telling the absolute truth. I feel this strange connection to the unknown. Its not that I want to know the answers really. Its more that I want to get lost in the search; hoping to find out what the question means rather than what the answer actually is… if there is one.

I love the part of Hitchhiker’s Guide that deals with this very dilemma. The most advanced race in the galaxy built the most sophisticated computer developed and gave it an obscene amount of time to come up with the answer “what is the meaning of life, the universe, and everything". The answer, it turns out, is 42. What was missing, then, and unknowable, was a better question. In the end  the question, the pursuit of the correct perspective or context was what was most meaningful.

I think this is something that is lost in our society, and perhaps author Douglas Adams was privy to this loss. We are focused on quick answers, the arrival, the reason, the absolute truth, when really what we need is a better question.

42 and the Answer to the Meaning of Life

The other day I told my therapist that if I was born 1,000 years ago I would have been a mystic. I was partly kidding but party telling the absolute truth. I feel this strange connection to the unknown. Its not that I want to know the answers really. Its more that I want to get lost in the search; hoping to find out what the question means rather than what the answer actually is… if there is one.

I love the part of Hitchhiker’s Guide that deals with this very dilemma. The most advanced race in the galaxy built the most sophisticated computer developed and gave it an obscene amount of time to come up with the answer “what is the meaning of life, the universe, and everything". The answer, it turns out, is 42. What was missing, then, and unknowable, was a better question. In the end  the question, the pursuit of the correct perspective or context was what was most meaningful.

I think this is something that is lost in our society, and perhaps author Douglas Adams was privy to this loss. We are focused on quick answers, the arrival, the reason, the absolute truth, when really what we need is a better question.

ramurphy

ramurphy

I’m a married, 30 something living in San Francisco. I spend my time eating well, getting together with friends, exploring new ideas and places, and reading wide into a variety of subjects. I love to learn and consider new ideas.

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